‘Fortune’s Rocks’ by Anita Shreve

Fiction – paperback; Abacus; 476 pages; 2001.

It’s been three years since I last read an Anita Shreve novel. She’s usually my go-to author when I’m looking for some light but immersive reading. I like her plot-driven stories, which are typically peopled by strong, resilient women often caught up in moral or ethical dilemmas.

Fortune’s Rock, published in 1999, was her eighth novel (before she died in 2018, she penned 19 novels — and I’ve read most of them).

Set at the turn of the 20th century, it’s an age-old story of a teenage girl falling for an older man and then being forced to suffer the consequences of her illicit liaison by a society that sees everything in black or white.

A summer love affair

When the book opens we meet 15-year-old Olympia Biddeford walking along a New Hampshire beach one hot June day in 1899. Her family — a poorly, mainly bed-ridden mother and a rich, scholarly father who publishes a literary magazine and home schools his daughter — have decamped to the beachside community of Fortune’s Rocks from Boston for the summer.

In the time it takes for her to walk from the bathhouse at the sea wall of Fortune’s Rocks, where she has left her boots and has discreetly pulled off her stockings, to the waterline along which the sea continually licks the pink and silver sand, she learns about desire.

All the men on the beach staring at her sets the tone for the rest of this 400-plus page novel, for Olympia, on the cusp of womanhood, is subject to the male gaze at almost every turn. When she meets her father’s friend,  John Warren Haskell, an essayist and medical doctor, the way he looks at her takes on deeper meaning.

There is no mistaking this gaze. It is not a look that turns itself into a polite moment of recognition or a nod of encouragement to speak. Nor is it the result of an absentminded concentration of thought. It is rather an entirely penetrating gaze with no barriers or boundaries. It is scrutiny such as Olympia has never encountered in her young life. And she thinks that the entire table must be stopped in that moment, as she is, feeling its nearly intolerable intensity.

Despite 41-year-old Haskell being married with four children, the pair go on to have a passionate love affair that opens Olympia’s eyes, not only to love and desire, but to the wider world in general. When she accompanies Haskell on one of his medical rounds at the impoverished mill town in nearby Ely, she witnesses childbirth for the first time and begins to understand that her upbringing has been rather staid and sheltered. This only heightens her desire to seek out new experiences.

Their summer-long affair, which comprises trysts in Haskell’s hotel room while his wife is away, and later in the half-constructed coastal cottage that Haskell is building for his family, skirts dangerous territory. There is an unknown witness to their affair, who manages to expose their wrongdoing at the worst possible moment: Olympia’s extravagant 16th birthday gala party attended by more than 100 people.

Plot-driven story

This is a plot-driven novel and it’s difficult to say much more without ruining the story for others yet to read it. Let’s just say that ruination results for both Olympia and Haskell’s family, and a good portion of the novel is set in a courtroom.

But for all its old-fashioned sentiment, its expert portrayal of late 19th century morals and its championing of young women’s rights, I had some issues with Fortune’s Rocks.

It’s too long for a start. A judicious cut of at least 100 pages would not take anything away from the plot. It feels a bit prone to histrionics in places, too, and is far too predictable from start to finish. And the courtroom bits towards the end, particularly in the way that Olympia behaves, seems informed by late 20th century attitudes.

And don’t get me started about John Haskell having his way with a 15-year-old! Shreve paints a very sympathetic portrait of him and suggests that Olympia knew exactly what she was doing —

“Though I was very young and understood little of the magnitude of what I was doing, I was not seduced. Never seduced. I had will and some understanding. I could have stopped it at any time.”

— but I still didn’t buy it. This kind of relationship would be scandalous today; more than 100 years ago it would have been ruinous!

In short, this isn’t the best Shreve book I’ve read, nor is it the worst (that honour lies with A Wedding in December). It was a good distraction for lockdown reading, requiring little brainpower, and kept me entertained for a week. But on the whole, Fortune’s Rocks — even with its happy, redemptive ending — didn’t set my world on fire.

This is my 15th book for #TBR2020 in which I plan to read 20 books from my TBR between 1 January and 30 June. I “mooched” a paperback copy of this book years and years ago (circa 2006), but I read the Kindle edition for this review.

8 thoughts on “‘Fortune’s Rocks’ by Anita Shreve

  1. I went through a stage of reading lots of Anita Shreve but I’ve probably not read any of her novels for about 15 years. I would like to read her again, but not sure this is the place for me to start – that relationship is abusive, whatever Olympia thinks. At 15 I thought I knew everything too!

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    • Thank you… you have just articulated what I couldn’t… that the relationship was abusive. I suspect this was why I couldn’t buy Olympia’s argument that she was a willing participant. There are several scenes early in the book where Haskell is effectively grooming her… I found that all a bit ‘icky’

      If you are looking for a recent Shreve novel to read, I enjoyed ‘The Lives of Stella Bain’ and ‘The Stars Are Fire’

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  2. Yes, Shreve does write plot driven books. Maybe that’s why I stopped reading her books… I prefer character driven novels. She wrote really well, but… not for me. Good review, though!

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    • They’re plot driven but she’s also very good at writing characters… I think she gets pigeonholed as “women’s fiction” but I think she’s a crossover novelist and most (not all) of her books stand up as literary novels. She’s an excellent storyteller and sometimes that’s all I want — to get lost in a good yarn 😊

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      • Nothing wrong with women’s fiction – which, by the way, is NOT romance, or chic-lit, both of which I do not read in general. I’ve read Shreve, and even reviewed one of her books on my blog, but… I find her characters a bit flat sometimes. But that’s just me.

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        • I don’t have a problem with “women’s fiction” but a lot of people (ie. the media, the “establishment”) are snobby about stuff they don’t regard as “literary”. Heck, I’ll admit I’m snobby about some stuff too 😉

          I get what you’re saying about some of Sheve’s characters – they can be one-dimensional at times. And likewise, the plots can be predictable. She’s not for everyone…

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          • Well, then the “establishment” doesn’t know what its talking about because women’s fiction is totally literary fiction – just from a women’s point of view. I did a whole blog post about this a while back.

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